Study: When Kids Have Summer Jobs, Violent Crime Goes Down

“As summer begins, the Department of Labor has touted a study that revealed that students with summer jobs are 43% less likely to be arrested for a violent crime.

The study, which was authored by University of Pennsylvania criminologist Sara Heller, put 700 Chicago teens in jobs that were either 25-hours-per-week or 15-hours-per-week. The students in the study all came from schools with high rates of violence. The students were also from disadvantaged backgrounds — 90% of them qualified for government-aided school lunch — and were mostly minorities. They were hired in to fill roles such as camp counselors and office assistants and were paid the Illinois minimum wage of $8.25 per hour.” Read more at Attn: by clicking here.

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Insurers, business council assail pregnancy insurance bill

bill to allow pregnant women to buy insurance under the Affordable Care Act outside the regular enrollment period is coming under fire from business interests and a trade group who say it could open a Pandora’s Box by allowing anyone to wait until they are sick to buy insurance.” Read more at Capital New York by clicking here.

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For-profit colleges lose bid to scuttle government rules

“‘We’ve said for some time that lawsuits targeting the Administration’s recent gainful employment policy were nothing more than a charade to avoid accountability,’ said Rory O’Sullivan, deputy director at Young Invincibles, a consumer advocacy group. ‘In light of recent closings at poorly performing for-profit programs, we are glad to see a federal judge uphold these critical consumer protections.’” Read more at the Washington Post by clicking here.

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Report: Job market tough for California millennials

“If job-seeking were a job, Quinn French would be an elite candidate. He’s attended career fairs and employment expos, met recruiters and distributed resumes. He’s scoured online postings, filled out numerous applications and even completed personality surveys.” Read more at the Santa Monica Daily Press by clicking here.

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University of Oregon considers creating UOCare, its own self-insured student health plan

“The University of Oregon is proposing to create its own health insurance plans — UOCare — and to sweep all new and returning students into one of the plans come fall.

The plan would include the existing on-campus health care plus a yet-to-be-identified net­work of off-campus doctors, counselors, urgent care and hospital services.” Read more at the Register Guard by clicking here.

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Jobs tour reveals stories inside California’s millennial workforce problem

“Millennials make up 37 percent of California’s workforce and are expected to represent 50 percent of the workforce by 2025. Irving Pineda is California Outreach Coordinator for the Young Invincibles who just released a report on the Millennials in California. Pineda directed a California Jobs Tour recently, which engaged 200 millennials across California on their job prospects. He agreed to answer a few questions about what he heard.” Read more at California Economic Summit here.

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Juggling College, Child Care Leaves Millennials Impoverished

People say millennials are a lot of things – more educated, more entitled, more likely to have student debt. They’re also more likely to be parents, oftentimes while they’re working toward earning a college degree.” Read more at DC School Hub here.

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YES, MANY STUDENTS ARE GETTING DIPLOMAS THIS SEASON – BUT WHAT ABOUT THOSE WHO ARE STRUGGLING?

“College graduations are around the corner. Yet while commencement ceremonies are cause for celebration, how many students will leave school with diplomas that they were able to get in a timely way, or without first stumbling through their course options?

As a student who found it really tough to navigate my course options as a freshman, I think it’s time for a national conversation about how schools can better support students who are just beginning their journeys.” Read more at emPower Magazine by clicking here.

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Skin in the game could incentivize colleges to keep costs down

With tuition and student debt soaring dramatically over the last decade, many families are sitting around their kitchen tables wrestling with how to pay for college. In fact, the number one concern of U.S. parents is being able to pay for their kid’s college education, according to a recent Gallup poll.” Read more at the Hill by clicking here.

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THE DEBT DIVIDE: THE RACIAL AND CLASS BIAS BEHIND THE “NEW NORMAL” OF STUDENT BORROWING

Today, taking out loans is the primary way individuals pay for college—a major shift in how our nation provides access to higher education. While concerns about the growth in college costs and student debt are nearly universal, much of this concern focuses on how college debt is impacting the economic well-being of college graduates and our overall economy. What has been less understood, or examined, is how this shift to a debt-based system impacts our nation’s historical commitment to ensuring everyone—regardless of race or class—can afford to go to college. We need to understand whether or not the “new normal” of debt-financed college is having an impact on our ability to make good on that fundamental promise.” Read more at Demos by clicking here.

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